Transport – IELTS Speaking Questions By Mark Allen

The topics in IELTS Speaking Exam are always about something familiar to you, such as “What you do”, “How are you? etc.

You should not speak too quickly or too slowly. It is also important to have good intonation and stress. You will not get a high score if you are too hesitant and have too many pauses when you speak, although a few pauses to collect your thoughts are fine.

Try not to speak too quickly, either. Rapid speech often indicates a lack of cohesion in what you are saying and severely affects the rhythm and flow of your speech.

Below is the list of few IELTS Speaking Questions by Mark Allen in Transport category:

Question – What means of transport do you usually use?

Answer – I don’t have a car, so I usually use public transport, like buses, or taxis, or the metro. It’s convenient for me.

Question – What’s your favorite means of transport?

Answer – My favorite way to travel is by plane, because it’s quick and convenient, even if it is expensive. I love to fly above it all and forget about traffic jams.

Question – How do you like to travel for long trips?

Answer – By plane, because then it doesn’t take me so long to get to my destination. I don’t want to waste my valuable time just getting there. I have more important things to do.

Question – What’s the traffic like here in Beijing?

Answer – It’s not so bad; because of the subway, it usually doesn’t take long to get from place to place.

Note: The drivers are rude; they look at you and will just run you over.

It’s one of the worst cities to live in because of the traffic it has. People generally give themselves at least an hour extra time to arrive on time.

The commuter traffic in the morning starts at 7a.m. and does not end until 10a.m. and then the afternoon traffic starts about 5p.m. and does not end until 8p.m. And forget about it on Friday afternoons, especially in summer.

Beijing really does look like a giant car park, doesn’t it?

Question – How do you think the public transport could be improved?

Answer – Well, here in Beijing I think they just need to add a few more subway lines and add some more ring roads and have more buses available, in order to improve public transport.

Note: I think higher fuel prices are going to help. Having an on-line carpool database to get people from their homes to public transport nodes, or having secure cycle lockers at railway stations and bus stops might help too.

I have recently returned from a holiday in Switzerland. It is nice to go there occasionally to remind myself of how things should be done. In over a week I didn’t see one traffic jam. Cities were all refreshingly free of cars. Yet the Swiss have a better standard of living than we do. The secret? Well there isn’t one really – It’s just that the government accepts that a comprehensive network of public transport is vital to the efficient running of the state. Therefore, all trains are electric; all run at regular times generally at least hourly 7 days a week. Bus stations are always located next to railway stations. Buses always connect with trains and with each other. Timetables are always available. Trams and trolley buses dominate transport in the cities.

Everything runs with absolute precision (the lack of traffic jams helps facilitate this). Connections are guaranted… I could go on really, but I might start crying. All it takes is the political will to do something and it could be done – but as it is I suspect that politicians don’t care so it isn’t going to change. Learn to enjoy sitting in traffic jams – appreciate the freedom that a car brings you – and to the people sitting in the bus behind you.

Increased frequency of buses and trains, make transport more accessible to people with disabilities and those on low incomes.

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